Questioning the luck of the potluck

xx

— Source: icanhas.cheezburger.com

“You’re a terrible lesbian,” W said to me yesterday.

I knew exactly what she was talking about.

“You mean the potluck.  Because I have no faith in the luck of the potluck,” I replied.

We’re having a potluck at the wedding to cut down on costs.  I’m worried there won’t be enough substantial food for our guests.  I was going to make two trays of ziti and now I’m afraid that won’t be enough.  I was thinking about testing out some crockpot recipes this weekend.

“Whatever you want, baby,” W says.

That’s what she tells me when she knows my head is about to explode.

W is cool and calm about the potluck.

“If we get five kinds of potato salad, we get five kinds of potato salad,” she says.  This has become her potluck mantra

Maybe I should just pray to the potluck goddesses for a plentiful spread.  Or perhaps sacrifice one of those mini crockpots or a tray of deviled eggs and call it a day.

* * *

The wedding is only two weeks away, so I will be posting short wedding-related posts as we count down to “she do” and “she do, too.”

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13 responses to “Questioning the luck of the potluck

  1. Perhaps not leaving it up to “luck” would be in order? You could come up with a suggestion list (kind of like a wedding registry, but for food) and have folks pick something on the list to bring. It might not be fool proof but at least your anxiety can come down some. Just a thought. Good luck.

  2. Yup. You know who the good cooks are – and what their specialties are. I’m always flattered when someone says “You know that cold sesame noodle dish you made on Memorial Day? Could you bring that here?” or makes a special request. So flatter your friends and let the not so great cooks bring the Cheese Doodles.

  3. I agree with all these! My friends decided to do the pot luck thing for their reception but as the others have stated, it was more of a suggestion based event.
    I liked the way they did it, though. They split it into an alphabetical system.
    People whose last names were between A and L brought main dishes. Those between L and Z brought a veggie or side dish. The deserts were careered by a friend who owns a catering company.

  4. Overplan the party, overcook the food. People love to be fed. A crockpot full of meatballs is cheap. Ziti is too. And a couple of batches of brownies, oatmeal cookies, and a cake. There is still cheap local produce around, how about a big salad? We usually do a giant batch of hummus, which is a real luxury food. The most expensive ingredient is the jar of tahini. Someone you know must have a hispanic or caribean background. Ask them to bring whatever style of rice that they make, and it will get eaten for sure. And, you must know a few friends with an eastern european roots. Request galumpkis, or some other specialty their grandmother made.
    For our last party, we ordered 75 peices of fried chicken from our local Redner’s store. For less than fifty bucks. Everyone ate real good.
    Go ahead, be a terrible lesbian.

    • Ziti is on the menu. And we’ve ordered a giant sheet cake. I found out how to cook 60 hot dogs in a single crockpot. So, that’s a possibility. We have Redner’s around here. I like the idea of fried chicken. Who doesn’t like fried chicken?

      • Just a hint: the one Redner’s here (Berks county) makes excellent chicken, the other stores, not so much. Give that chicken a test drive first!

      • Good to know. We are in Montgomery County. My mom has offered to buy the chicken. She said she would sample Redner’s, Acme, etc. Growing up, we always called KFC “Chicken Diane.” My mom’s name is Diane, and that’s what she brought home for dinner when she didn’t feel like cooking.

      • I love the Chicken Diane! We have a friend who spontaneuously shows up every couple of years on the doorstep with a bottle of Colt 45 (not our usual fare). Next time, I am calling her “Loretta 45”.

      • Nothing wrong with some Colt from time to time. Actually, it goes well with Chicken Diane. 🙂

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